10 Ways to Absolutely Ruin your Projects

Instead of providing a list on how to successfully run a project management office, I chose a different route and set out to assemble a list of valuable information that guarantees project failure under any given circumstance. If you are a project manager or run a PMO, the recommendations you will read below are full of promise and will definitely get you into trouble.  With that in mind, here are…

10 Ways to Absolutely Ruin your Projects

  1. Start a project without a defined goal or objective:  Like a ship without a destination or a race without a finish line, starting a project without a goal is an exercise in running in circles.  No matter how much time, effort or money you through behind it, you’ll never accomplish what you set out to do because it was never clearly defined.  Then again, it’s also a great way to stay out of trouble because you’ll never know when your project is ‘moving sideways’.
  2. Run a project that is not aligned with the company’s objectives:  I know ‘mobile tech’ is really cool.  So is ‘social media’.  So let’s kick off a project to do that.  Wait a minute.  Did we ever check with our customers – both internal and external – if this is what they are asking for?   Do we know if this project help move the company’s goals forward?  I don’t know, but let’s call it “Rogue Project” because it sounds so cool.
  3. Manage a project that does not have a sponsor’s support:  Like a football quarterback without his offensive line, running a project without a sponsor to provide direction, remove obstacles, and ensure support to move the project forward is a great idea.  Please let us know how that works out for you, OK?
  4. Make a project more complex just for complexity’s sake:  If two levels down into the work breakdown structure is good, six levels is great.  It’ll show people how much more smart and experienced you are than them.  If you can do this effectively, it leads to…
  5. Micromanage your team, especially the senior level people:  Which studies show is a great way to lose supporters. Really fast.
  6. Don’t consider the benefits or ROI before you kick off the project:  Project benefits are so hard to define.  And who knows if we’re ever going to achieve them anyway.  So let’s not worry about it.  Just give me that bag of money so I can start my project already.  It’s not about value after all – it’s about working with cool technology.
  7. Recreate the wheel when starting a project:  I know my organization has done something like this before, but I’m really, really smart and don’t need the help.  I’m happy to start all the deliverables from scratch.  Or maybe this time I’ll just make up a new methodology.  Why recycle and reuse when I can just recreate?
  8. Allow your project’s scope to change on a whim:  if we don’t have a good change control process it makes the project easier.  If we learn new things, let’s quickly move in that direction.  We can call it ‘iterative execution’.  Just like a new puppy deciding if he wants to chase a ball, bark at the other dogs or have a snack.
  9. Don’t check in with the stakeholders or customer through the lifecycle of the project:  we already understand what they want, so bringing in them back in as we move through the project will only give them a chance to get more engaged and supportive.  Nah…let’s just surprise them at the end.
  10. Spend, spend, spend:  Don’t worry about budgets – they’re just rough estimates, anyway.  If we need to get more developers and fly the team out to Las Vegas for a workshop, so be it.  By the time the financial team finds out it will be too late anyway.

Hopefully the list above is taken as a cautionary tale – maybe even a checklist of what not to do.  How do you stack up against it?

What is a successful Project Management Office?

This is a question that has been posed many times and answered many times.  Yet, we continue to see PMOs failing very often.  Does it mean that the answers that have been presented are incorrect?  Not necessarily.  In fact, most answers surrounding metrics and value are relevant but don’t address the question of “fit”.  The metrics that make sense for one business may not make sense for another.

At the end of the day it is about demonstrating value to the business as a whole.  A successful PMO is a PMO that is focused on business value and helps the C-suite succeed in its strategic objectives.  Daptiv’s four-part PMO Success Webinar series explores this in more detail.  The goal of the webinar series is to provide real-world insights on how PMOs can become strategic assets to the business.